Business VoIP: Nearly 8 Million Business VoIP Lines by 2012.

 Projections by Pike & Fischer’s Broadband Advisory Services say over 5 million U.S. businesses will use an Internet telephony line (i.e. VoIP) by 2010 and ramp to 7.8 million by 2012.

More importantly for carriers, revenues from business customers will triple over the next five years to hit more than $6 billion, P&F says in its “VoIP in the Business World: Market Forecast and Analysis” report. The biggest chunk of the market will be large enterprises with AT&T and Verizon likely to retain the biggest chare of these customers.

Smaller companies have fewer built-in resources and may take a bit long to adopt VoIP, but the sheer size of the SMB market has attracted a number of new entrants who are doing a better job selling into it.

Another research from Infonetics Research puts adoption rates in 2005 at 36 percent of large, 23 percent of medium and 14 percent of small North American businesses.  By 2010, Infonetics predicts almost half of small companies and two-thirds of large organizations in North America will be using VoIP products and services.

So what’s the hold up? Businesses are reluctant to get rid of their legacy handsets for more costly IP-equipped ones, even though they buy into the idea of the value to migrate to an IP telephony system. Most enterprises choosing to migrate are doing so because they can keep their existing (legacy) investment, operating in a hybrid mode.

Pike & Fischer: VoIP in the Business World: Market Forecast and Analysis.

 

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